So, is this why ‘recollections may vary’? Prince Harry admits to ‘misremembering’

Prince Harry has suggested his memories weren’t always the sharpest – despite also saying his versions of events have just as much truth as ‘so-called objective facts’ in his explosive memoir.

The Duke of Sussex, 38, who is now based in California with his wife Meghan Markle and their two children, Archie, three, and Lilibet, one, discussed his memories throughout his book, Spare, which was released in the UK yesterday.

At one point, when recalling a trip to the late Queen’s Scottish estate, Balmoral, in the summer of 1997, he explained how he can recall, in ‘crisp detail’, ‘landscape, geography, architecture’ but struggles with ‘dates and dialogue’ ‘.

But then he added: ‘Whatever the cause, my memory is my memory, it does what it does, gathers and curates as it sees fit, and there’s just as much truth in what I remember and how I remember it as there is in so – called objective facts.’

The Duke of Sussex (pictured with Prince William and the late Princess Diana in 1995), 38, who is now based in California with his wife Meghan Markle and their two children, Archie, three, and Lilibet, one, discussed his memories throughout his book, Spare, which was released in the UK yesterday

Elsewhere, the duke later suggested his memory ‘had been spotty’ after his mother Princess Diana’s death – but then went on to say he could be ‘misremembering my own struggles with memory from back then’.

He said: ‘As a defense mechanism, most likely, my memory was no longer recording things quite as it once did.’

However, the prince revealed how months of therapy apparently improved his ability to recall memories from the past, including moments with his late mother.

Harry’s comments about his memory come after fresh questions were raised about the accuracy of his memoir when his bold claims on royal ancestry and being gifted an Xbox years before its official release were debunked.

At one point, when recalling a trip to the late Queen's Scottish estate, Balmoral, in the summer of 1997, Harry (pictured on Tuesday) explained how he can recall, in 'crisp detail', 'landscape, geography, architecture' but struggles with 'dates and dialogue'

At one point, when recalling a trip to the late Queen’s Scottish estate, Balmoral, in the summer of 1997, Harry (pictured on Tuesday) explained how he can recall, in ‘crisp detail’, ‘landscape, geography, architecture’ but struggles with ‘dates and dialogue’

Harry's comments about his memory come after fresh questions were raised about the accuracy of his memoir when his bold claims on royal ancestry and being gifted an Xbox years before its official release were debunked.  In Spare, the duke wrote glowingly of his 'great-great-great-great-great-great grandfather', King Henry VI (above) who founded Eton College and died in 1471

Harry’s comments about his memory come after fresh questions were raised about the accuracy of his memoir when his bold claims on royal ancestry and being gifted an Xbox years before its official release were debunked. In Spare, the duke wrote glowingly of his ‘great-great-great-great-great-great grandfather’, King Henry VI (above) who founded Eton College and died in 1471

Harry's link to Henry VI was debunked by experts taking to social media (pictured)

Harry’s link to Henry VI was debunked by experts taking to social media (pictured)

In Spare, the duke wrote glowingly of his ‘great-great-great-great-great-great-great grandfather’, King Henry VI who founded Eton College and died in 1471 – despite the fact his alleged ancestor’s direct lineage ended after his son, Edward of Westminster, died as a childless teenager at the Battle of Tewkesbury.

The duke also claimed he was gifted an Xbox by his aunt, Lady Sarah McCorquodale for his 13th birthday in 1997 – but the best-selling device was first released in the United States four years later in 2001.

His link to Henry VI and Xbox gift were both trashed by eagle-eyed readers on social media, who slammed the inaccuracy and lack of fact-checking for a project that cost a reported £16 million ($20 million).

Recalling his 13th birthday, Harry wrote that he excitedly opened his presents to reveal that he had received the game console, which he claims was bought for him by his mother shortly before her death.

Prince Harry's new memoir Spare (pictured) went on sale in the UK yesterday

Prince Harry’s new memoir Spare (pictured) went on sale in the UK yesterday

While eating cake and sorbet during the celebrations, the duke said he was asked to make a wish and was thinking of his late mother when his aunt appeared clutching a box.

He said inside was an Xbox, before admitting that the story ‘appeared in many accounts of my life, as gospel, and I have no idea if it’s true.’

The Xbox was Microsoft’s first foray into the world of console gaming, debuting with a global launch in 2001 that ignited a fierce rivalry with Sony’s PlayStation 2 and Nintendo’s GameCube.

Meanwhile, historians were quick to take to social media to question the accuracy of Harry’s link to the last of the Lancastrian dynasty.

Royal correspondent Patricia Treble pointed out the genealogical error in Spare and the fact that Henry VI had no descendants after his son’s death in 1471.

Meanwhile, Harry (pictured on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert on Tuesday) sensationally accused the monarchy of trying to 'undermine' his memoir because its controversial contents have 'perhaps made them feel uncomfortable and scared' as he launched another furious attack on the Royal Family in the latest in a line of TV interviews to promote his book

Meanwhile, Harry (pictured on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert on Tuesday) sensationally accused the monarchy of trying to ‘undermine’ his memoir because its controversial contents have ‘perhaps made them feel uncomfortable and scared’ as he launched another furious attack on the Royal Family in the latest in a line of TV interviews to promote his book

Others pointed the blame for the Henry VI error at the memoir’s ghostwriter, award-winning American journalist and author JR Moehringer. MailOnline has contacted the book’s publisher, Penguin Random House, for comment.

Henry VI’s bloodline continued through later generations when the son of his half-brother, Henry VII, ruled as King of England between 1485 to 1509.

Prince Harry’s actual great-great-great-great-great-great-great grandfather was King George III, who reigned from 1760 to 1811, more than three centuries after Henry VI died.

Meanwhile, Harry sensationally accused the monarchy of trying to ‘undermine’ his memoir because its controversial contents have ‘perhaps made them feel uncomfortable and scared’ as he launched another furious attack on the Royal Family in the latest in a line of TV interviews to promote his book.

The 38-year-old held nothing back as he took aim at his family during an appearance on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert on Tuesday, where he lurched between hurling more barbs at his family and making light-hearted jokes including about his ‘frost -nipped’ genitals while swigging a glass of tequila.

Harry also took part in a skit with Tom Hanks and clinked glasses with Colbert as he praised America as a ‘great place to live’ and said how much he loves ‘beautiful California’, sparking cheers from the audience. He whipped up the crowd on several occasions, offering them all some tequila and talking about his Army career, asking: ‘Are there any veterans in the house?’

One of the more serious moments during the lengthy sit-down saw Harry rounding on his relatives over the backlash to his memoir, with Colbert questioning whether he believes the royals have an ‘active campaign to undermine this book’.

‘Of course,’ the duke responded – adding that ‘the British Press’ has also been complicit in the ‘campaign’, with Colbert chiming in: ‘But aided and abetted by the Palace.’

‘Again of course,’ Harry confirmed. But this is the other side of the story, right? After 38 years, they have told their side of the story. This is the other side of the story.’

The father-of-two then suggested that what he perceives as the royals’ ‘campaign’ against his memoir has come as a result of them being ‘uncomfortable and scared’ over its contents.

“There is a lot in there that, perhaps, makes people feel uncomfortable and scared,” he continued.

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